food

Revision cookies

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It’s going to be a few weeks before my alter ego has to get to work on JERICHO revisions, but I went ahead and made a batch of revision cookies anyway. I like to have food squirreled away in preparation for the long march to –30–: soups, burgers of various types, maybe a meatloaf. Chicken breasts and portions of fish. And home-baked cookies. I’ve tried making do with packaged cookies, and they’re not the same–I don’t feel like I’m having an end-of-the-day treat when I have one of those. There are some bakery cookies that I love, especially the whole grain-dried cranberry and cowboy cookies from Whole Paycheck. But in that case, I need to make a choice between a month’s supply of cookies and paying the mortgage, and if I don’t keep up with the mortgage, I won’t have a place to write. So, I bake my own cookies.

Ina Garten has a couple of cookie recipes that have become standbys, namely her Oatmeal Raisin Pecan and her Ultimate Ginger. I had a boatload of old-fashioned oats, and I love oatmeal cookies, so I opted for the Oatmeal Raisin Pecan…with a few changes.

  1. I substituted dried Door County cherries for raisins. I love raisins, but I wanted to try something a little different.
  2. Instead of all-purpose flour, I used 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Whole Wheat Pastry Flour and 1/2 cup wheat germ. The w/w pastry flour worked well when I made a loaf of post-first draft banana bread a couple of weeks ago–apparently it’s made from the soft wheat berry, so it’s higher in carbs, with less gluten and protein. Because of those characteristics, I have found I am able to use it as a replacement for all-purpose, at least so far. I am guessing that if I tried to make pie crust or some types of bread, the story would be different. But I’ve found the cookie and banana bread recipes to be pretty forgiving, so I will stick with whole wheat flours when I make them.
  3. I added about a cup of unsweetened coconut to the pecans and toasted the whole mess together.
  4. Spices. In addition to the cinnamon, I added 2 tablespoons Spice House chai spice. It sounds like a lot. But the directions state to use 1 tablespoon in a 6 oz cup of tea, so I figured that 2 tablespoons wouldn’t overwhelm a recipe that can yield 3 dozen cookies.

Verdict? The flour and wheat germ worked great–the cookies are moist and have a little chew, which is how I like them. I don’t like really chewy, soft cookies. The cherries are good, but a little on the sweet side. Next time I will use raisins or good dried cranberries. As for the chai spice, it added nice depth. I might back off to a tablespoon or a tablespoon and a half next time, though, because it is strong. I will see if the flavor mellows over the next few days.

Oatmeal-dried cherry-coconut-pecan-chai cookies

Oatmeal-dried cherry-coconut-pecan-chai cookies

weather

Snow

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Yes, it did. 14.5 inches officially, according to the recording station nearest me. Turned out to be the fifth largest snowstorm in Chicago history, with an official O’Hare tally of 19.3 inches.

The wind pushed things around and made them pretty uneven. The roof looks like someone did a really messy job of frosting a cake with stiff frosting, thanks to the wind. Meanwhile, 7-8 inches in some parts of my driveway, well over a foot in others. A foot and a half or so up against the garage and of course, at the end of the driveway thanks to the snowplows. Behemoth chewed through it all, bless his 2-stage heart. I just wish he didn’t handle like a bus with flat tires.

After I finished the driveway, I dug out the front steps and the rear sidewalk. Part of the deck. This way, Herself has plenty of room to maneuver. She was the little supervisor through all this.

supervising

supervising

We are apparently supposed to get a few more inches Tuesday evening, which will be just dandy. Not sure when I will be able to take Gaby for a walk. The park district usually plows the bike trail, but I doubt that it’s a priority at the present time.

Stay safe and warm, if the storm hit you or is headed in your direction. If you avoided this brush with Old Man Winter, well, lucky you.

food

No-soak bean stew

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Yup, a food post. You’ve been warned.

Over on Facebook, Lynn Flewelling posted a link to an article about how pre-soaking beans prior to cooking was unnecessary. I perked up when I read it because I love bean soups and stews, but never made them because of the soaking step. Slow overnight soak or fast one-hour boil and soak? If you don’t do it right, you’ll wind up with bullets. It didn’t help that the one time I presoaked navy beans for baked beans, they came out hard and gritty. I just didn’t think I’d have success if I tried again.

But this article gave me hope, so. I found the recipe for black bean stew and set about chopping the onion because I knew I had a pound bag of black beans in the pantry. Except that when I looked, I found I didn’t. I did have a pound of navy beans. A year-old pound of navy beans–I remembered the day I bought them at Whole Paycheck, the good little organic shopper shoveling her beans into a bag…then sticking them on a shelf and forgetting about them. I knew beans aged and got tough over time, but I figured that all I risked was half an onion and some time. It was either try to cook the beans or use them as crust ballast for blind baking…except that I already had a couple of pounds of dried beans set aside for that purpose, yet more navy and pinto beans that I bought with every intention of cooking and never did.

Anyway, along with the onion, garlic, and chopped dried chile pepper, I added a teaspoon of ajwain (an Indian seed that flavors and also mitigates that issue with beans that we all sang about in second grade**), some herbs de provence, diced sun-dried tomatoes, celery seed. I didn’t add bay leaf because I didn’t have any, hence the other stuff.

La:

just getting started

just getting started

 

Heated until it just started to simmer, then covered it and stuck it in a 325F oven. I figured that navy beans might take longer to cook than black beans, and I was right. I let them cook for close to two hours before adding the salt, checking them all the while–yes, they were absorbing liquid. Yes, they were getting softer:

getting there--about halfway through

getting there–about halfway through

 

After about three hours, I made tuna fish for dinner because I realized that the beans wouldn’t be done in time. Besides, anything stew benefits from sitting overnight, and I figured this would be the case with this stuff as well. I added salt and pepper–about 2 tsps salt instead of the single one called for in the recipe. Stirred and stuck it back in the oven.

At the three-three-and-a-half hour mark–the beans were still intact but creamy when chewed–I zapped the stew with the immersion blender and creamed maybe 1/3 of them.

almost finished

almost finished

I also added a large squirt of ketchup because I always add ketchup to navy bean soup, and a tablespoon of vegetable demiglace because frankly I still found things a little flat. Then I let it cool and stuck it in the fridge overnight.

Today, I added a can of Ro-Tel diced tomatoes and a little more salt. It is a very thick stew–if you wanted something more soupy, you could add stock or more diced tomatoes or water. I like it thick, so I heated some up in the microwave, stuck some cheddar cheese on top, and had it with a toasted roll.

the finished product

the finished product

It’s good. Yes, the beans have more flavor than canned or–from what I recall–presoaked. I was also struck by how well they remained intact even though they were very tender. Not mushy at all. Or gritty.

I bought black beans today, as well as lentils and white beans. Looking forward to making more no-soak bean dishes. They will need to cook longer, so I will have to be careful which recipes I try.

 

**also, Blazing Saddles

 

holidays life

Enter title here

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Hope everyone had a good holiday. Happy New Year’s Eve Eve! Tonight it will be 27 years since the fire that my dad had going in the fireplace licked through gaps in the mortar and set the rear of the house on fire. I had just closed on the place two weeks prior–another five minutes, and I’d have lost it. Instead, I had insurance company hassles–no-name insurance, just don’t do it–and major outlay for a new, BUILT TO CODE, fireplace.

27 years. Some events always seem…more recent. And always will.

One week until GIDEON hits the shelves–the Alex Gordon half of this one-person writing team will be busy. Check over there for details and appearances etc if you’re interested. The next few months will be spent working on JERICHO, the follow-up to GIDEON, as well as comic con appearances and working on getting the Jani Kilian books into ebook format and cleaning out the house as part of the long-term move-across-the-country prep. General everyday life will get tucked into the spaces.

I thought that after I left the day job I would have all this extra time. Ha.

2015 is almost here. The time, does it ever fly.